A Wonderful Simulation Game – Kindergarten

Wow… this is the coolest game! I love babies, so playing Kindergarten was so exciting for me! The colors and graphics are great. The details of the babies are amazing! You can totally see kids in their laughing as well as weeping moods. Kindergarten is a fun-filled, colorful and interactive management simulation game where you play Mila, the super sweet owner of the Kindergarten! Kindergarten is a high quality & entertaining cell animation game…which makes this game so incredibly interactive and fun!

Mila Says:

“Hi! I am Mila together we will manage a Kindergarten, this means taking care of babies”

Parents bring their babies to Mila’s Kindergarten, and you have to help Mila take care of the babies. All of these different babies have many different needs and they will for sure keep you occupied! If a baby goes pee-pee or does a doo-doo, you have to help Mila take the baby in her arms and change its diapers! When the baby gets hungry, you will have to help Mila prepare a bottle of formula. Once the bottle is heated up in the Bottle Warmer, Mila can give the bottle to the baby! Usually it takes a while for a bottle to heat up. Once Mila earns more money you will be able to buy a faster Bottle Warmer with her!

You have to make sure that you take good care of the babies and that you keep them happy! The happier the babies are, the more money you can earn from the parents that drop off their babies! If you fail to keep babies happy, you will be penalized and you will not earn any money!

Mila says:

“We will start with two babies and if we do well our Kindergarten will get more babies to take care of. With the money earned, we upgrade the interiors and exteriors of the Kindergarten. Eventually more parents will bring their babies–and the Kindergarten will start to grow!”

Once you earn money in the game, you can start using it to upgrade and expand interiors and exteriors of your Kindergarten! Mila only has a few toys in her Kindergarten, and she plans to buy more toys once she earns more money! You will have to help her!

I love the fact that you can do so much in this simulation game, like hire people. You can chose different types of employees and decide what kind of agency you want to use. Another neat thing is that you can decide whether you want to hire people permanently or just temporarily. The selection of employees to help you run your Kindergarten is great! You can hire a nanny, a receptionist, and more. You can even hire a clown to keep the babies happy! So cool! I love it that you can expand your Kindergarten as well with the real estate agent; like add stuff to it (such as a bedroom, kitchen, etc.). The shop is great! You can buy the greatest stuff to upgrade your KINDERGARTEN from the inside (such as beds, cribs, etc.). This game is definitely a challenge for anyone! Youda Games has really done a good job making this game!

The History Of Flight Simulator Games

Flight simulators are virtual tools that are designed to teach the user how to fly an aircraft without the risk. When you are learning how to fly professionally or for fun, you cannot buckle yourself into a 747 and expect to catch on in a matter of minutes. Flying an aircraft is not like riding a bike; one small mistake can have serious consequences. This is why flight simulator games were created to help teach training pilots how to fly. Learn about the history of flight simulation and see just how much it has advanced over the years.

The first known arcade game to use flight simulation was Jet Rocket. This simulator was released by Sega in 1970 and was designed as a form of entertainment and not training. The game featured a cockpit complete with all of the controls and a basic and stationary landscaping scene on the screen. Players could shoot missiles and explode targets before their eyes.

The advancement of these types of games brought the release of Jet Rocket making way for a whole genre of combat simulator games. The next popular game to hit the arcades was Interceptor made by Taito in 1975. This first-person shooter took flight simulation to a new level and used a joystick so the player could aim at enemy aircraft and disintegrate them in mid-air.

It was not until the 1980s that flight simulator games were made for personal computers. They have remained very popular on personal computers to this day. The first PC game to hit the market was subLOGIC. The subLOGIC game, created by Bruce Artwick, has basic graphics, real world scenery, and a mock control panel. The creator made several different versions of subLOGIC for Mac computers and later for IBM compatible computers. The IBM compatible versions were licensed under Microsoft as Flight Simulator 1.00. The company later released 2.0 and 3.0 versions with more aircraft options and better graphics.

After PC games, came more advanced games for playing consoles in the home. Sega released a flight simulator game in 1987 that was titled After Burner. This combat game used a joystick and was widely popular on the Genesis and later the PlayStation. Super Nintendo also released a game called Pilotwings. This game helped the player earn their pilot license by completing flight lessons that were built into the game.

These types of games may have started out slow but they have graduated into a huge market. They are designed to entertain you and teach you what it feels like to control an actual aircraft. New simulator games have advanced so much that you will really feel like you are controlling a plane. If you choose the right game, you can use controls that are found in actual cockpits and select the weather and time of day you want to fly. You can even fly over your house and see it with satellite technology. The world of flight games will continue to grow.

Computer Hardware and Simulation Gaming for Aviation Safety Considered

Modern day computer hardware is getting quite robust, and there is about 10 times the computing power in a smart phone as was used to fly the first Space Shuttle, maybe more. Still, when it comes to operating today’s aircraft simulators the computer hardware is intense, and these simulators can cost a ton of money. Because they cost so much the time to use them becomes very valuable, therefore most airlines only use them as required to check out their pilots, or train them for certification on the next aircraft that pilot needs to fly so he or she can get their type rating and satisfactorily prove they are safe.

The other day, I was speaking with an expert in computer online gaming communities, Troy Laclaire, about the use of simulators in aviation, and how great these tools were for complying with safety standards and preventing mistakes in the real world, carrying real passengers, when it really mattered most. One question we pondered was should airline pilots, commercial pilots, charter pilots, and fractional jet pilots be required to fly with another pilot to an airport first prior to going there as the pilot in command for the first time.

If such an onerous rule were to be made by the FAA, what about simulators, couldn’t a pilot merely fly the last 5-10 minutes on approach and take-off to each airport that the airline generally went too? Maybe, but in the case of a charter jet, that might mean they’d spend 100s of hours in a simulator and that costs a lot of money right? Okay so is there a solution to all this? Troy has come up with one potential solution, so lets’ talk about this shall we. First, Troy notes:

The only problem with this is that simulators are not exactly cheap to run and each simulation takes a fair amount of time, and far as I understand simulators are mostly used to get pilots comfortable with flying a particular plane type. However, since the pilots are generally already familiar with flying their planes (at least I should hope so) and nearly everyone has computers these days, it is possible that you could have a DVD series created to cover the routes, based around actual flights, and then have the pilots use their computers to run these so that they can get some familiarity with the airports.

Now then, this is a good idea, and it makes sense, a perfect solution, plus it also stands to reason that a gaming expert would come up with this concept. Okay so, Troy also suggests that we “provide the pilots with a take home DVD, basic flight-sim gaming controls, and they can use these to get some muscle memory.” This too makes sense, keeping it simple, and perfect for a last-minute booking for a fractional jet, or charter flight, as the pilot can merely practice a couple of ILS approaches, missed approach, take-off, and navigating the taxi ways, etc.

Troy, being a computer hardware engineer, and quite the prudent safety advisor also states; “Alternatively, have a “pilots room” setup where a pilot can run through a video/basic simulator of a previous flight that has already flown that route, letting them get a rough idea of what to expect when going to an airport they are not yet familiar with.”

Okay so that’s pretty easy, it can be set up in the break room of the local Jet Center, or at an FBO etc. Perhaps, for $10-20 they can shoot a couple of landings at the desired future airport that they will be flying too? Perhaps, it might also be available to ALL general aviation pilots, the DVDs and a flight simulator room at the local FBO, etc. May as well keep the system busy and paying for itself, perhaps it might also spit out certificates of completion and aviation insurance companies may consider lowering rates too? Indeed, I hope you will consider all this and think on it.